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6 Ways to Boost Your Executive Presence

6 Ways to Boost Your Executive Presence

Executive presence is the leadership quality that will help you become the leader that others can’t help but notice. It helps you to inspire confidence in others and demonstrate your capability, reliability and potential as a leader. 

Here are 6 ways to boost your executive presence.

It’s built on three pillars; how you act, how you look and how you speak and includes your attitude, confidence, non-verbal communication, emotional intelligence, public speaking skills, and even your personal brand. 

When you improve your executive presence, you’ll be more likely to stand out from your peers and be offered the kinds of opportunities that you deserve. Working with an executive coach who is experienced in helping leaders boost their confidence and influence with executive presence characteristics will make a significant difference to your performance. 

In the meantime, here are 6 tips that can help you get started. 

1. Polish your speaking and presentation skills

If you want to improve or boost your executive presence and increase your confidence, you must work on improving your speaking skills. When you can speak with clarity, you will share your message more effectively, appear to be more confident and, perhaps most importantly, inspire your audience and connect with them on a deeper level. 

It’s not only the words that you use that will have an impact, but how you deliver that message will determine the way in which it is received. Working on your leadership voice is part of developing your executive presence.

Leaders who speak too quickly or too slowly, use a monotonous voice, speak in a high pitch or don’t articulate the words clearly are likely to miss the mark. Own your voice, speak up and be heard. 

2. Develop your confidence

Confidence is one of the most important ‘soft skills’ you’ll need to become an inspiring leader and develop ways to boost your executive presence. When you can demonstrate quiet confidence, and move with energy and intention, you will inspire a sense of trust and senior management will be more likely to sit up and notice you. 

However, many of my coaching clients feel that their lack of confidence is permanent and they will never be able to work through it, but as I explain to them, this certainly isn’t the case. There are many tricks and techniques we can use to help you control your nervousness, cultivate confidence and stand out from your peers. There is a lot written about mastering executive presence.

Learn to speak with confidence by attending my one day training course in Perth.

Here are 6 ways to boost your executive presence

3. Use the power of non-verbal communication

Strong, positive body language is essential when it comes to building your credibility, connecting with your listeners and again, inspiring confidence. Here are some tips that can help you boost your skills:

  • Prepare: know your message and practice speaking beforehand.
  • Visualise: imagine yourself speaking with confidence and presence. 
  • Make eye contact: whether you’re speaking to just a few people or a larger audience, making eye contact will help you build your executive presence.
  • Be present: remember that you’re there to deliver a message. It’s not about you.
  • Stand confidently: keep your feet hip-distance apart and your feet firmly grounded. Relax your shoulders. 

4. Create a positive first impression 

Did you know that it takes people just a few seconds to decide a person’s characteristics when they meet them for the first time? 

This includes traits like trustworthiness, competence, charisma and likeability that are critical for building business relationships and growing a successful career. When a person believes that you are professional, you’re more likely to be presented with new career opportunities and foster growth. 

To maximise your impact, start by tweaking your appearance. Dress to impress. Be neatly groomed at all times and wear the correct style of clothing for your industry, culture and level of formality. A solid first impression will boost your executive presence.

You can have everything in life you want if you’ll just help enough other people to get what they want!”

Zig Ziglar

5. Showcase your personal brand 

Effective personal branding can provide you with a winning advantage when it comes to your career, especially during these uncertain times. It’s practically impossible to succeed in the modern world unless you are maximising your impact in this way. Be proactive and ensure that you’re maximising the impact of yours. Consider the following:

  • How are you showing up online and offline? 
  • Are you using social media to showcase your expertise? 
  • Do you have an up-to-date profile picture on LinkedIn? 
  • What does Google say about you? 
  • Are you grabbing public speaking opportunities to share your message? 
  • How effectively do you network
  • How do you dress?

Each of these factors will affect your personal brand and allow you to promote yourself and your expertise more effectively. 

6. Build your self-awareness and Emotional Intelligence

Effective leaders are always aware of how emotions can influence the outcome of any relationship or negotiation. They are aware of their own emotions, how they can impact others and how they can effectively manage them for best effect. They also make the effort to notice other people’s emotions, demonstrate great empathy and can resolve conflicts effectively. 

The great news is that emotional intelligence isn’t a skill that you need to be born with. You can improve your soft skills by tuning in to your emotions and noticing how to respond in stressful situations or when faced with conflict or change. Also, get feedback from others to understand how you are perceived by others and be willing to make any changes needed to help you develop your executive presence and grow your career. 

Summary

These 6 ways to boost your executive presence will help you to build your leadership communication skills. By improving your public speaking, confidence, harnessing the power of non-verbal communication, creating a positive first impression, improving your personal brand and building your Emotional Intelligence, you can inspire confidence and trust so you can build your professional career.

I can help you boost your executive presence and fulfil your potential. Contact me today to find out more.


About Lisa Evans

Lisa Evans helps professionals to craft compelling business stories and become exceptional speakers. Lisa is a certified speaker coach, TEDx speaker coach, four times author, NLP practitioner, graphic recorder and visual storyteller, and improvisational actor. 

She has coached thousands of leaders across a range of industries, including resources, banking, finance, engineering, retail and sales as well as not-for-profit and community associations. 

If you wish to take advantage of a complimentary session in order to chat about how you can become an exceptional and successful speaker with a stand-out brand, then use this link to book a time to chat. Download my new E-book How to Build Confidence and Overcome Nervousness.

Give Feedback without Sugar Coating

Give Feedback without Sugar Coating

One of the key elements of effective leadership communication is the ability to give feedback that is honest and helpful. 

Book Summary – Radical Candor

Radical candor is a refreshing book for anyone who leads a team, and in particular, if you want to give feedback in a way that helps others to develop. It is a way of communicating at work to bring out the best in yourself and others. I have created this one-page book summary sketchnote based on the concepts in the book Radical Candor by Kim Scott.

Being a leader can be tough at times, particularly when you are faced with those difficult conversations about under performance. You know the ones, management books from years ago would recommend that you give feedback using the s*it sandwich approach – beginning and ending with praise and a dash of criticism cushioned in the middle. 

There is a better way to give feedback according to the author of the book. 

Our ability to have tough conversations is paramount to the success or failure of any team. 

When a boss is considered too harsh, people tend to feel unvalued and consider their manager a bully. When a boss has a head in the sand approach to underperforming team players, then resentment can build. 

If you have ever been in a team where you are carrying the weight of another because the boss can’t have an honest and open conversation, then you will know this feeling. How about the team members who cruise along delivering to a mediocre standard?

Give feedback in a way that guides and serves others

In this book, the author provides a four-quadrant framework to help leaders become better communicators, in particular the ability to effectively give feedback, as well as receiving it. There are also plenty of other tools in the book related to career conversations and decision making. 

According to the author radical candor is 

Building radically candid relationships begin by bringing your whole self to work. This includes going beyond turning up with your professional self. It is built on trust and caring about others in a genuine way. 

The concept of “Care Personally” is the result of showing up with your whole self and caring about your team members on a human level – not simply about them in their role at work. It includes building relationships and being willing to be sociable at work whilst respecting boundaries. 

When you Care Personally, it leads to your ability to Challenge Directly. This is part of Scott’s framework to address issues of underperformance, telling people when their work is not up to standard, as well as telling them when they are doing well. 

You can start by finding out what motivates your team members, what matters to them and where they want to get in their career. 

When Care Personally and Challenge Directly come together – Radical Candor is the result.

What it is not

Radical Candor is not a license to be rude or ignorant, nor is it being blunt and aggressive, or sugar-coating your message. 

It is not being fake! If you are not willing to let your guard down at work and you wish to be 100% professional, you may find it difficult to build trust and candid relationships with those in your team. 

Radical Candor is not dependent upon hierarchy, it’s not about ego and it is not about becoming overly friendly with your colleagues. 

It is that sweet spot, where you are able to give feedback that will guide and serve the other person and help them develop. 

What are the benefits of Radical Candor?

A radically candid leader can give feedback and receive it equally well. When feedback is given it is always direct and sincere, it is specific and helpful. 

There are four quadrants in the Radical Candor model.

The only quadrant to operate from is the Radical Candor area where Caring Personally and Challenging Directly are aligned.

The second area that is less than ideal but preferable to the quadrants on the left of the model is Obnoxious Aggression. I had to read this art twice as it sounds counterintuitive. When you are so direct that it is criticism without caring then you may be labelled confrontational and unpleasant, but your team members will know exactly where they stand. The other way that this can play out is when criticism is given in front of others in an attempt to humiliate. 

At the bottom left of the framework is the quadrant of Manipulative Insincerity, which is according to Scott, ‘..you don’t care enough about a person to challenge them directly’.

Sucking up to others, the desire to be liked, and worrying about what others think of you can result in this approach. Manipulative Insincerity is not helpful and does not lead to trusting and fulfilling working relationships. 

The final quadrant on the top left is Ruinous Empathy. This is the classic sugar coating scenario where a leader will turn a blind eye to work that is not good enough for fear of hurting someone’s feelings. Or offering up praise that is not really justified. People don’t know where they stand when they have a boss who operates from this quadrant. 

Give Feedback Radical Candor Graphic Recording Lisa Evans

I worked for a department that demonstrated this style. During the 12 months, I worked there, three people were transferred into the team. I later found out they were passed off to the team as they had a history of underperforming. This quickly caused resentment as some people saw the transfer as rewarding poor performance, and others had to pick up extra work or fix mistakes. Transferring out team members who are not working up to the required standard is, at the very least a band-aid solution. 

If only they’d read this book. By transferring these people it was not really helping them long term. 

When you give feedback in a radically candid way it can feel uncomfortable at first

Putting Radical Candor in place at first may feel uncomfortable. The author suggests that as a first step, a leader can ask for, before they give feedback, so they can feel what it is like to receive criticism from others as a starting point.

When a team has the radical candor ethos, trust is formed and results are achieved. 

There are plenty of tools, tips and ideas in the book to help you communicate in a way that is fair, open, and helps people understand what they can do to improve. 

Effective communication is the cornerstone of any team. Radical Candor is an ideal book for anyone who is a boss, leader or who is stepping up to lead. 

Learning how to embrace this approach early on in your career so that it becomes intertwined in how your form relationships at work will be a solid way to serve your team well.  


I began Graphic Recording early in my professional speaking career as a way of internalising material. I don’t use notes or memorise any material, as I dislike the way that memorised speeches sound. When I create a storyboard for one of my talks, it allows me to capture the picture as a visual and this gives me a much better grasp of the message and makes it easier to craft my talk around the concepts. I also share this method with my clients.

I often gift one-page sketchnotes to authors if I have read their book, and for a small fee I can sketch other non-fiction books of your choice. 


Feature Photo by Karolina Grabowska from Pexels


About Lisa Evans

Lisa Evans helps professionals to craft compelling business stories and become exceptional speakers. Lisa is a certified speaker coach, TEDx speaker coach, four times author, NLP practitioner, graphic recorder and visual storyteller, and improvisational actor. 

She has coached thousands of leaders across a range of industries, including resources, banking, finance, engineering, retail and sales as well as not-for-profit and community associations. 

If you wish to take advantage of a complimentary session in order to chat about how you can become an exceptional and successful speaker with a stand-out brand, then use this link to book a time to chat. Download my new E-book How to Build Confidence and Overcome Nervousness.

How you can stand out as a facilitator

How you can stand out as a facilitator

How you can maximise your success as a facilitator

Have you sat through a facilitation session that did not meet expectations? Most of us have been in a room where someone has hogged airtime, the content is not valuable and after all that, nothing changes. 

When a leader hires a facilitator they expect a competent confident person who is able to help them to achieve the intended outcomes. For many leaders, facilitation is one of the skill sets that they will need to have as part of their suite of leadership communication ability.  

stand out as a facilitator

Here are 7 tips to stand out as a facilitator 

1. Core Values 

Having core values that support the objectives of the group and can focus on the process as a neutral participant. The facilitator is not there to present their knowledge or demonstrate subject matter expertise. 

The mindset values include

  • Collaborative over competitive
  • Cooperation over resistance
  • Action over procrastination
  • Progress Over perfection
  • Participation over observation

2. Planning

In order to help the group to reach the desired objectives the facilitator has to spend time planning and preparing.In doing so, these are some common questions that can guide planning

Do you understand the content and directed outcomes?

Have you prepared a mutually agreed agenda?

How the logistics were arranged such as equipment, space, location and timings?

Are you familiar with the culture and army group dynamics?

Have you done background research?

3. Earning credibility

In order to get buy in from the group you want to demonstrate your credibility. Your success depends on how well you can communicate the core competencies such as active listening, effective communication, managing conflict and issues as they arise. Effective time management, recording of data. 

4. Create a rich learning environment

There are opportunities for learning through collaboration, reflection and interaction. Facilitators have a range of learning techniques to help people stay engaged and to enhance learning. Technology also helps to provide a rich and varied learning environment. You may use equipment such as smart boards, video conferencing, interactive multimedia presentations or consider having a graphic recording of the agreed outcome of the session. 

5. Connect and energise the room

A good facilitator will have multiple tools in their kit to help with connection, building rapport and keeping the energy right. The skill is knowing what tool to use when and which methods are more likely to succeed.

6. Set and be firm about ground rules

When core parameters are set, it is easier to manage the discussion and to stay on track with the agenda.  Once the tone is set and the expectations have been agreed on, a skilled facility must be prepared to be firm about maintaining the ground rules. 

7. Stay present and have fun

You do not have to be boring to stand out as a facilitator. When you are able to stay present, engage with your participants, challenge yourself to step up and to continue to learn more about yourself and your skills each time you facilitate. Ask for feedback and don’t assume you will always get it right. 

Lisa Evans is a Communications Consultant based in Australia who helps leaders share their message with confidence, clarity and credibility. 

Here’s how I can help you

Virtual Masterclass – This live masterclass Communicating with Influence or Business Storytelling for Leaders can be delivered as a 30 minute session x 3 or a 90 minute session. 

Virtual/Online Training – A live class (not pre-recorded) This session is 4 hours duration, with 90 minutes of interactive content, a 30-minute break, followed by another 90 minutes. This session is ideal for small to medium teams. Topics include Communication for emerging Leaders, Communicate with Influence, Public Speaking for Business Success, Presenting Online for Leaders Managing Virtual Teams

Virtual/Online Coaching – Public Speaking and Storytelling Coaching via Zoom at concession rates during this challenging time.

Virtual Presentation – Now is the time that event planners can access speakers to present virtually from anywhere in the world. 

8 Practical Tips to Communicating Effectively in Virtual Meetings

8 Practical Tips to Communicating Effectively in Virtual Meetings

As a leader you are most comfortable presenting in the boardroom and with your team in a face to face setting. 

With the new way of working and the rapid shift to the online world, leaders are having to adapt to communicating in virtual meetings. 

I have spoken to many leaders who are unfamiliar with presenting online and hosting virtual meetings. 

Now is a vital time for efficient and effective communication. As well as accurate and timely information, we need to build and maintain rapport and engagement in a time when a high level of trust is essential. 

8 practical tips to tips to communicate effectively in virtual meetings.

1. Have an agenda  

Just like you would in any other meeting have an agenda that you can send out prior to the meeting along with any required reading or notes. If you are new to virtual meetings it may be easier for you to send the information by email rather than try to share your screen during the meeting. 

You may want to make your online meeting shorter than you normally would. It’s harder to keep people engaged online, and even more so now as our routines are disrupted and we are coming to terms with this new way of working.

2. Start and finish on time 

Often virtual meetings can start and finish late due to technical glitches. Sometimes technical glitches are blamed when the issue is lack of planning!

If you are the host of the meeting, arrive early to the online space. Set up your workspace and your surroundings so that you are ready to start on time. 

Remember to allow some social interaction.  Now is the time that we need to feel connection. Perhaps a quick ‘round the virtual room’ and making time for questions. If your team generally has a bit of light chit chat prior to or at the end of a meeting, continue that. 

3. Dress for business

How you show up is important. As a leader you want to exude executive presence and confidence. Your non-verbal communication has to be congruent with your words. 

It’s too easy to turn up in our casual clothes and opt to have your webcam switched off, but I think it’s important that we show up dressed for work, and have the video camera on. 

Think about your posture too. When you sit up straight with your back supported in the back you will look confident.  You will be able to use your voice effectively when you have good posture.

4. Meet and greet 

Be present and ready in the virtual meeting space as people arrive online. It doesn’t instil confidence when the host of the meeting is head down looking at other screens, on the phone, or fiddling around with papers. 

As the host it’s your role to be there and be ready and to be available to meet and greet people. If your meeting is large and there may be lots of online chat or questions, it is useful to have another person to manage this side of it. You can make them a co-host of the meeting so they have the same onscreen access as you. 

5. Be stationary 

Ideally you will have your laptop set up somewhere but you may be hosting the virtual meeting platform using your phone. That’s ok, but it’s best not to wander around while you are speaking, the people on the receiving end will be distracted by the shakiness and movement. Prop your phone onto a shelf or desk somewhere so that you are still. 

6. Sound

Remember to turn off any unnecessary distractions. As our notifications often come through the same device we are using for the virtual meeting it’s easy to forget to turn them off. And of course there is the dog! Maybe the children and other household sounds that are not usually there when we are in the office. 

7. Lighting 

If possible position yourself somewhere where you have some natural light. By the window is a good spot. You will see in this eight minute video that I have used some lights as it was recorded on a cloudy day. 

When you have your camera on for the virtual meeting look directly to the camera. Eye contact is really important. Look directly into the camera lens and avoid looking at the image of yourself or others on the screen, and we don’t want to be looking up noses or at the top of people’s heads, so set up your video camera at eye level. 

8. Gestures

Remember to smile! A smile will help people feel welcome to the virtual meeting. Building trust is essential right now. It’s also ok to use your hands when you speak as you normally would in a face to face meeting.  

Keep your arm movements close to your body otherwise your hands look enormous when they are close to the screen. 

I hope that those tips have been helpful for you. I have not gone into any of the software or technical tips for virtual meetings as I wanted to keep this post short and simple. These are only some of the tips required for effective online communication. If you would like to take part in next weeks’ virtual masterclass then contact me.

If you’d like a virtual coaching session or virtual training on how to effectively communicate with a remote force then do get in touch.

Three productivity tips to free up more time

Three productivity tips to free up more time

Whether you are working from home, self-isolating, or your business has pivoted overnight, here are some productivity tips to help you stay productive. 

It is uncharted territory with new and maybe challenging ways of working, and perhaps a considerable amount of stress and uncertainty. 

As you adapt and settle into remote working, there are plenty of productivity tips and tools on offer to assist you to structure your day.

I have always been a planner and a detail person, and years ago I worked remotely before virtual teams were even a thing! In 2008 I was part of a national project team, with one team member in each state. The technology was not what it is now, but we still had to come up with efficient and creative ways to stay connected and get our work done across the distance. 

With the disruption to routines, we have to create a ‘new normal’. 

We have a normal. As you move outside of your comfort one, what was once unknown and frightening becomes your new normal.

– Robin Sharma

3 ways of working to boost productivity.

Project Tracking Tools

There are many different programs and apps to help compartmentalise time and communicate across teams. I have tried a few but always come back to KanbanFlow.

KanbanFlow is a Lean project management tool allowing real-time collaboration between team members. The tool also supports the Pomodoro technique for time tracking. 

The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. KanbanFlow incorporates the Pomodoro technique that you can toggle on or off.

The downside to KanbanFlow is that the free version does not allow you to share boards or integrate with uploading docs from other places such as Google Drive. The paid version is a reasonable monthly cost. 

Staying in Touch 

The simple Customer Relationship Management tool that I use is Capsule.

Capsule is a cloud-based CRM application that enables me to keep track of the people in my network. It has a lot more bells and whistles than I use, but it does just what I need to keep all communication about the contact in one place. 

I have avoided sending out blanket emails with updates on how I am doing amidst the current crises. I believe now is not the time to contact those who you have not communicated with for years. Relationships take time to build, adding to the noise of content can easily cause people to switch off.  

Inbox Management

I adopted the inbox zero approach several years ago after reading David Allen’s Getting Things Done (GTD).

The concept of inbox zero was coined by Merlin Mann, who wrote 43 Folders a blog about finding time to be creative.

The term inbox zero does not mean you have to keep your inbox empty at all times; it simply means spending less and more productive time in your inbox so that you can clear your brain for other tasks.

To achieve an inbox zero way of working, the three main things that Mann suggests are:

  • Use the 4 D’s model of delete it, delegate it, do it, or defer it when you are processing email.
  • Keeping your email program closed for most of the day and turning off those pesky notifications.
  • Respond right away to messages that can be answered in two minutes or less (this principle is from the GTD methodology). 

What tips, tools or technology tools do you use to help with productivity?

About the author

Lisa Evans helps leaders and entrepreneurs to craft compelling business stories and become exceptional speakers.

She has coached thousands of leaders across a range of industries, including resources, banking, finance, engineering, retail and sales as well as not-for-profit and community associations. 

If you wish to take advantage of a complimentary session in order to chat about how you can become an exceptional and successful speaker with a stand-out brand, then use this link to book a time to chat.

Here’s how I may help you 

My services include: 

Virtual – Live Online Training – Public Speaking and Presentation Skills, Business Storytelling and executive Speaker Coaching is available online.

Business Storytelling Coaching – together we can get started to create your suite of stories. A minimum of three sessions is recommended 1:1 in person or virtually via Zoom.

Executive Speaker Coaching – if you have an upcoming guest speaking opportunity, funding pitch, conference talk or you want to be an outstanding speaker, we can work together on your technique. You will see the results after one session.

Storytelling for Leaders Interactive Workshops – I can come to you, or we can host a workshop offsite for your team. From half-day to two-days immersive, this customised workshop is an ideal way to kick start your business storytelling strategy and get the whole team telling stories. 

Keynote/Guest Speaking at your next conference live of virtual event – I have several topics to choose from ranging from a 30-minute talk up to a 90-minute interactive session.

Lisa Evans, MBA is the CEO of Speaking Savvy. She is one of less than 150 Certified Speaking Professionals in Australia. She is a Certified Public Speaking and Storytelling Coach, Certified Virtual Presenter, Accredited Business Coach (ICF), Author, TEDx Speaker Coach, NLP Coach, Graphic Recorder, Host and Curator of Stories From The Heart, and Improvisation Actor and Marketing Director at Perth Playback Theatre.

The Unselfish Way of Networking

The Unselfish Way of Networking

I must confess. I am not a fan of networking. I have been to events where business cards have been thrust upon me and elevator pitches regurgitated into my lap. I leave feeling empty and uninspired. I have met many people in my work as a public speaking coach and trainer who don’t enjoy networking. The events that I do enjoy are the ones where business cards remain firmly tucked away, and people are genuinely interested in others.

I feel drawn to connectors – these are the people you meet at networking events who are not seeking reciprocity or short term gain, they are eager listeners and they bring people together in an attempt to help others.

Be a Connector

I was reading an article written by Linda Murray about the Super Networker or the Connector, and it reminded me of the business opportunities that I have had this year as a result of the connectors in my life.

Malcolm Gladwell coined the term connector in his book The Tipping Point where he describes this person as ”one who knows many people”

The way I like to define a connector is: Someone who has a genuine desire to helps others by introducing them to people who can help them or be helped by them. I don’t think it is a numbers game, even if your network is relatively small you can aim to be a connector.

What makes a good connector

  • The ability to listen deeply
  • The skill of asking the right open ended questions
  • The willingness to help others without any expectations
  • A love of people and the ability to find the good in others

Six simple ways you can be a connector

Here’s how you can be unselfish at networking. Remember, that by attending networking events you will become a better speaker as it’s a great way to practise.

Attend networking and business events and listen more than you speak.

Be an active listener and aim to speak less. When you do speak, think of a question you can ask the other person that will help you find out more about them.

Use an empathic listening style. According to Otto Schamer and Katrin Kaufer in Leading from the Emerging Future empathic listening is when the listener is willing to see reality from the perspective of the other and sense the other’s circumstances.

When you leave the event, make a couple of notes about any particular person who stood out with a skill that you know others may benefit from, and make the effort to find out more with a follow up conversation.

Share information that you know others will enjoy

If you discover a great book, resource or article on a topic that you know will interest someone in your network send it to them in an email or message. Chances are if they enjoy it, they will reply which allows you to reconnect and they will pass it on to others. Can be as simple as ‘thought you might be interested in reading this’ – I really enjoy getting a short message with some new content to read. The best way to do this is to send others’ material not your own, as connectors avoid overt self-promotion. This is an efficetive way to carry on the networking conversation.

Be willing to share your expertise

If you are known for your willingness to offer tips and valuable advice to others you are more likely to be known as a connector. If you are a coach or consultant do you offer a complimentary session? are you open to a virtual or face to face coffee catch up to provide some tips to someone that a connector has sent your way?

Do a simple yet courteous email introduction

Introduce the two parties by way of a simple email, then leave it to them to do the rest. It is best to ask permission first to avoid any awkwardness.

I once had a lady write to me to suggest I needed a videographer (she took a dislike to my homemade video!) she copied in the videographer into the email. I then got a full quote in my inbox with the message – you wanted to know what my package rates are!! I didn’t and in fact, I had seen some of the videographers work and wasn’t that impressed. Meeting someone at a networking event is not permission to add to your mail list.

Stay in touch with your network

Keep in touch with your business connections so that you remain abreast of their area of expertise, and how they can help others in your network. If they are changing focus in their business or offering a new product or service, that may be a good time to consider what new connections you can facilitate.

Say Thank You

When someone gets in touch either directly or via an introduction as a result of a connector then remember to thank them. I’d like to thank all the wonderful connectors in my life and I look forward to attending more events where elevator pitches and business cards swaps are ditched in favour of deep listening, thoughtful questioning and serious thought about ‘who do I know who may be of interest or help to this person?’

Happy Networking!


About the author

Lisa Evans helps leaders and entrepreneurs to craft compelling business stories and become exceptional speakers. Lisa is a certified speaker coach, TEDx speaker coach, four times author, NLP practitioner, graphic recorder and visual storyteller, and improvisational actor. 

She has coached thousands of leaders across a range of industries, including resources, banking, finance, engineering, retail and sales as well as not-for-profit and community associations. 

If you wish to take advantage of a complimentary session in order to chat about how you can become an exceptional and successful speaker with a stand-out brand, then use this link to book a time to chat.

Here’s how I may help you

Whether you have a hidden story of your feet, or you want to nail your next presentation, I can help you.

My services include: 

Business Storytelling Coaching – together we can get started to create your suite of stories. A minimum of three sessions is recommended 1:1 in person or virtually via Zoom.

Executive Speaker Coaching – if you have an upcoming guest speaking opportunity, funding pitch, conference talk or you want to be an outstanding speaker, we can work together on your technique. You will see the results after one session.

Storytelling for Leaders Interactive Workshops – I can come to you, or we can host a workshop offsite for your team. From half-day to two-days immersive, this customised workshop is an ideal way to kick start your business storytelling strategy and get the whole team telling stories. 

Keynote/Guest Speaking at your next conference or event – I have several topics to choose from ranging from a 30-minute talk up to a 90-minute interactive session.